A comprehensive approach to trauma is needed to accurately assess the extent and evaluate the injury to the face, jaws, teeth, and related structures. A comprehensive biography, visual and radiographic (x-ray) analysis and physical assessment are all part of the evaluation. The patient’s health and developmental history are also taken into account during treatment.

The majority of oral and dental accidents are divided into three groups as a result of impacts to the soft tissues, jaws, and teeth themselves during an accident.

Soft tissues

Lips, noses, gums, and tongue bruises, scratches, and lacerations are included in injuries to soft tissues. To ensure that there are no entrapped bits of teeth or soil, these wounds would take meticulous washing and debridement. Sutures (stitches) may be required if the lacerations are serious. If there are puncture wounds, antibiotics and tetanus toxoid shots may be required to avoid severe and life-threatening infections.

Jaws

These include lower jaw dislocations and/or upper and lower jaw fractures. The trauma of tissues other than the teeth and the tissue that supports them, such as jaw bone breaks, will necessitate more extensive examination and scanning. The treatment of clear jaw dislocations is usually straightforward. Depending on the severity and position of the fracture, jaw fractures can require anything from easy fixation to splinting of a set of teeth.

Dental

It ranges from crazing and quick chipping through complicated cracks and avulsions, everything to do with teeth. If the teeth are broken, a term that refers to a breach in the outer defensive layers of a tooth, the enamel and dentin, more severe complications exist. If the fracturing is severe enough to expose the tooth’s inner pulp, you should see a dentist right away to avoid damaging the tooth.

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