Teeth are often thought of as discrete units, and your dentist might also assign a name and number to each one, but they are part of a larger system, with each one interacting with its neighbor to operate as a whole. Consider if the keystone of an arch secures all of the other stones or bricks. We should think of the human dentition as being made up of the anterior and posterior teeth for the sake of description.

The anterior teeth (canines and incisors) cut and tear food, while the posterior teeth (premolars and molars) grind and chew. The posterior teeth are also important in supporting the face’s vertical height. The face loses height and closes down if they are lost; this is known as posterior bite failure.

Teeth, unlike implants, slip; not only do these changes affect the alignment and biting ability of the remaining back teeth, but they also exert pressure on the front teeth, which appear to move or splay forward.

All of these improvements have ramifications for normal shape, which is referred to as aesthetics, as well as feature, which is referred to as bite. They will also damage other facial and jaw systems, affecting anything from the skin to the muscles and jaw joints. If the height of the jaw reduces, wrinkles appear, and the corners of the mouth droop, the appearance starts to change.

Furthermore, since the front teeth were not made for chewing, it may be painful to consume food. This is not to mention the social ramifications of teeth loss: smiling, chatting, humming, joking, and eating a nutritious diet all contribute to poor general and mental wellbeing.

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